Tag Archives: poetry

Our 2017 Bennington Interns are Here!

GWP is a proud participant in the Bennington College Field Work internship program, which we have been doing since our inception in 2014. Our Bennington College interns are all extremely motivated young people who care about the fate of the earth and want to do everything they can to foster a sustainable environment. Our newest interns just started this January and will be with us until mid-February. Please join us in welcoming Ruby, Rachel, and Liana!

Here is a recent photo taken at their first meeting with GWP author, Tim Weed (A Field Guide to Murder & Fly Fishing, due out April 2017), at our favorite Brattleboro hangout, Mocha Joe’s.

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GWP SPRING BOOKS 2017

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GWP SPRING BOOKS 2017 … a few great covers to share/sneak previews …
Nonfiction:
One Man’s Maine, Essays on a Love Affair by Jim Kroschell
Walking Through the Seasons, nature essays by Marilyn Webb Neagley
Why I Ride: Because a Bike Pedal Lasts Longer Than a Gas Tank by Holly McNish and Inja 
Wild Play by David Sobel 

Fiction:
A Field Guide to Murder and Fly Fishing, stories by Tim Weed
Horse Drawn Yogurt, Stories from Total Loss Farm by Peter Gould

Poetry (with Sundog):
Learning to See, poetry by Pamela Spiro Wagner
Roads Taken: Contemporary Vermont Poetry, edited by Sydney Lea and Chard deNiord with a Foreword by New Yorker staff writer, Dan Chaisson
Clothesline Religion, poems by Megan Buchanan

The Hopper Poetry Prize Winners with chapbooks to be published:
LongLeaf by John Saad
The Dark Edge of the Bluff by Ellene Glenn Moore

For Children:
Josie Meets a Jaguar, by B.K.A.B. Bruno, illustrated by Janet Pedersen

Fall books, 2017 are being assigned right now…
They include a picture book for children entitled Salamander Sky written by Katy Farber with illustrations by Meg Sodano …. another picture book called Janey Monarch Seed by Julie Dunlap … We are also publishing a new book of poetry entitled The Long Correspondence by the late Vermont poet, Leland Kinsey, a novel entitled Wild Mountain by Nancy Kilgore, a collection of short stories by Teresa Stores called Frost Heaves, and more!

Our “Poet’s Poet” Leland Kinsey, a Tribute

Our “Poet’s Poet” Leland Kinsey, a Tribute

BY HOWARD FRANK MOSHER

14355008_10154135421804682_3038776183872002142_nEarlier this month I lost a dear personal friend and Vermont lost its best poet since Robert Frost. Leland Kinsey of Barton, a seventh-generation Vermonter and gifted writer, teacher, naturalist, woodsman and storyteller, passed away after a long, courageous battle with cancer. Here is my tribute to Lee, who was also my fishing partner of 50 years.
Belonging
For Leland Kinsey
May 2, 1950 – September 14, 2016

Leland Kinsey and I loved to fish for brook trout in the Northeast Kingdom. Not just trout. And not just anywhere. Brook trout in the Kingdom.
I suppose that there are good, trouty brooks in Orleans, Essex, and Caledonia counties that Lee and I never discovered. Not many, though. At least once a week during fishing season, for nearly half a century, Lee and I would strike out early in the morning and follow a brook miles up through cedar bogs, upland meadows, hardwoods and softwoods, to its source at an icy spring high on some Kingdom mountain.
Lee was a poet’s poet. By that I mean that he did not care one bit about renown. He cared about results, about writing powerful and beautiful poems, often about the Kingdom, where he was born and raised and lived all his adult life. Vermont State Poet Sydney Lea said it best. Leland’s poetry “chronicles the profoundest Vermont anyone might possibly know.”
It’s hard to tell for sure, but my guess is that several dozen of Lee’s poems, or major sections of them, were inspired by those fishing treks we made to the wildest and most remote corners of the Kingdom. In his sixth collection – perhaps my favorite – The Immigrant’s Contract, he recounts the life and times of a French Canadian who, as a small boy, comes to the Kingdom with his folks in a horse-drawn wagon containing all their worldly possessions. Over the next seventy-some years he worked as a horse trader, logger, timber cruiser, whiskey runner, log driver on the Vermont tributaries of the upper Connecticut River, dairy farmer, dam builder – the list goes on. On our fishing excursions we explored many of the places Lee brought to life in The Immigrant’s Contract. The Upper Jay Branch, where Lee’s Quebecois jack-of-all-trades helped build the first road over Jay Peak. The Upper Black Branch of the Nulhegan in the wilderness northeast of Island Pond.
Not to mention the wildlife we encountered, the goshawks and pileated woodpeckers, the twenty varieties of warblers and scores of woods flowers – Lee knew them all by name – the great glacial boulders brought down from the Far North 10,000 years ago, every species of tree that grows in northern Vermont. Along with family history and local work – farming, blacksmithing, lumbering, sugaring, cedar-oil distilling, welding – the natural world that we immersed ourselves in on our quests for brook trout was a constantly recurring theme of Lee’s poems.
Early on in our fishing partnership, Lee and I made a deal. If either of us ever caught a 20-inch brook trout, the other would have it mounted for him. We both figured this was a safe arrangement. One June afternoon on a swampy brook in the Victory Bog, miles from the nearest road, Lee caught a 16-inch two pounder. That was the closest either of us had come until last fall.
It was late October, after most of the leaves were down, and raining lightly. The only color along the stream we were fishing – never mind what stream or exactly where – was the rusty yellow of the tamarack trees. At the time, Lee was in between grueling treatments at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, but still very strong. Still as good in the woods as any man in the Kingdom. I couldn’t see him but somehow I always knew about where he was on a trout brook we were fishing. He knew where I was, too. From upstream, around a bend, maybe a hundred yards away, I heard him say, not loudly, “Good one.” That’s all he said but if you knew Lee, that was enough. Net in hand, I thrashed my way through the bankside alders and hurried around the bend.
There he was in the misting afternoon, standing in the water with the fly rod he’d built himself bent almost double. The hooked trout was about midway between us when it exploded from the dark water, leaping up and up and twisting like a salmon. Its fiery red belly and green back and pink side-speckles with violet halos, its big square tail, its crimson fins edged with white stood out against the low, gray sky even brighter than on a sunny day. It hit the water like a beaver smashing the surface with its tail.
I never knew a man better at playing a fish than Leland Kinsey. It was a battle royal but ten, maybe fifteen minutes later, I slipped my landing net under the big brookie and held it up, shimmering, gorgeous, for Lee to see. “You win,” I said. Who do you want to mount it for you?”
“No one,” Lee said. “Put it back in the brook where it belongs.”
I cannot say that I was greatly surprised. I removed the hook and turned the net inside out, releasing the trout. For a moment the fish hung in the tea-colored water. Then it shot off into the depths of the stream where it belonged, and Lee and I fished on into the wild heart of the Kingdom to which he belonged and of which he was, and will be for all time to come, the truest poet laureate.

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Some photos of Lee for our memories . . . but his poems live on and we are honored to have been his publisher! If you want, you can listen to an interview Dede and Howard did on VPR here.

Freelance and Volunteers: Summer News

We are a low-profit publisher based out of Brattleboro dedicated to telling stories that will make the world a better place. Specifically, Green Writers Press is uplifting regional and national voices that embrace the natural world and interrogate the destruction of it.

PARTNER WITH US:
GWP is an L3C or a “low-profit limited liability company” which is a for-profit business that holds a charitable or educational cause as its main purpose. The business embodies our mission from our choice of printers (US printers that utilize renewable energy, forest stewardship council-certified papers, and soy-based inks) to our donation of a percentage of profits to national and Vermont-based environmental organizations.

Our vision is that collectively, our books will become a chorus of voices of writers and readers, artists and photographers, who care about the fate of the earth and want to do something about it.

If anyone knows of a non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization you think would like to partner with us as an L3C company, please tell them about us! It is tax-free for them to work with us on publications/books.

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AND NOW . . . SUMMER NEWS:
Green Writers Press is growing, but we are still primarily a VOLUNTEER RUN ORGANIZATION. We could not do what we do without our dedicated cadre of freelance editors! Please welcome our newest freelancer/volunteer staff members.

MARGARET SWEENEY, Assistant Editor and Publicity
Processed with VSCO with f2 presetMargaret Sweeney is a native of Brattleboro, Vermont and a recent graduate of Bennington College, where she studied literature and writing. While at Bennington, she interned for the literary organizations Poets House and the Center for the Art of Translation and served as co-editor-in-chief of plain china, the first national anthology of undergraduate student writing. She now lives in Western Massachusetts and works as a part-time bookseller at Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.

JAMES CREWS,  Assistant Editor

james_crewsJames Crews’ work has appeared in Ploughshares, Raleigh Review, Crab Orchard Review and The New Republic, among other journals, and he is a regular contributor to The (London) Times Literary Supplement. His first collection of poetry, The Book of What Stays, won the 2010 Prairie Schooner Book Prize and received a Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Award. Other awards include residencies from the Sitka Center for the Arts and Caldera Arts as well as two Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prizes. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing-Poetry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a PhD in Writing and Literature from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he worked for Ted Kooser’s American Life in Poetry newspaper column and grew to love the Great Plains. He now lives on an organic farm in Shaftsbury, Vermont just a few miles from the Robert Frost Stone House.

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VISIT US AT BOOK FESTIVALS COMING UP!
GWPatBOOKSTOCKGreen Writers Press has a BIG presence at BOOKSTOCK-VT, one of Vermont’s premiere literary festivals. Please join us!  http://bookstockvt.org/2016-presentations/
Left to right: Leland Kinsey (Galvanized), Sheila Post (The Road to Walden North), Cardy Raper (An American Harvest), Brett Stanciu (Hidden View), Tim Weed (forthcoming, A Field Guide to Murder and Fly Fishing), Sara Dillon (Planning for Escape), and Vermont State Poet Chard DeNiord (co-editor, with Sydney Lea, of the forthcoming Contemporary Vermont Poetry) . . . what a lineup!

Burlington Book Festival, Brattleboro Literary Festival, and more! 

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STAY TUNED FOR THE HOPPER PRIZE ANNOUNCEMENT AUGUST 1st!

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A Vermont Poet Shines Forth & Welcome New Interns & Summer Fellows

(Book Review)
Galvanized: New and Selected Poems by Leland Kinsey

By David Nilsen

galvanizedGalvanized, the new collection from Vermont poet Leland Kinsey, is a document of the hardship and rough-hewn beauty of living close to the land, in reach of its temper but also its embrace. Kinsey grew up on a Vermont farm, the child of a long line of such folk who clung to existence in the face of a cold north wind, working impossibly hard because to do less was to starve. These poems–some new, most from his seven previous books since 1991–are more closely tied to a particular place than any others I’ve read, and bring Vermont into a vivid focus, painting a landscape and a way of life I had never associated with the state.

Kinsey’s poems are beautiful but brutal pastorales, uncompromising in their depictions of the strain and heartache of living off the land. At times these poems feel like catalogs of woe, running through lists of injuries and tragedies, but they are never self-pitying, and they are never dishonest. The occasional joys of such hard lives are also given their turn, from necessary late night swims in glacial ponds to wash off the sweat and chaff after a day of baling, to summer baseball games, to barn dances to thank the neighbors for helping rebuild a burnt down farm building. Kinsey remembers sledding as a child, the near-suicidal danger of this diversion, the danger less impending than that of their farm work because it was chosen:

“We mostly slid at night to tell
if cars were coming,
no stopping at the corner
except by ditching at forty miles and hour,
blood and fractures either way.”
– page 97

More than anything, these poems chronicle survival, an endeavor that for Kinsey’s family was often a fraught and unforgiving one, but one that laid down from time to time in the shadow of joy. There is a wry humor underlying much of this poetry, rarely spotlighted but often teasing at the edges of harder truths, a humor that undoubtedly served its own role in the family’s endurance. In “Riding in the Open,” Kinsey recalls countless rides on top of farm loads in his youth, experiences that were sometimes fun, a chance to rest, and sometimes quite dangerous, and often both:

“I think of how we mostly could not talk,
mouths agape,
cheeks puffed out by the force of wind,
any conversation blown back passed us,
ears wind stopped,
and of the holding on,
and in the face of the black despair
we were all prone to,
wild laughter.”
– page 96

There is a section of the book containing poems from his 2004 collection In the Rain Shadow, a series of poems he wrote during his extended visit with his cousin in Tanzania. These poems present a jarring change of landscape and culture initially, but it quickly becomes apparent to the reader–as it did to the poet–how much there is in common between the experience the inhabitants of this impoverished nation have had in trying to scrape a living from the harsh African environment and the struggle Kinsey’s own family and ancestors had in prying a living from the glacier-scoured hills of northern Vermont.

Galvanized concludes with selections from Kinsey’s most recent collection, 2014’s Winter Ready. Living as close to (and off of) the land as Kinsey and his family have, many of his poems deal with the seasons, the heavens’ rationing of sunshine and rain, and the cruelties and wonders of winter, but this final section hones in on the way the calendar in a cold-weather climate bends around the gravity well of winter. Spring is about escaping it and planting as soon as the ground warms. In summer it can almost be forgotten as crops grow high and the sun beats down. But by fall, everyone knows what’s coming. Crops are gathered, wood is chopped, repairs are made, food is laid in. Winter will spare no one who isn’t ready. These poems perfectly encapsulate the simple clarity with which Kinsey documents the hardship of living as he and his family have, wasting little regret or resentment over the fairness of their lives. There simply isn’t time for it, and nature is as unforgiving with human life as it is with animal. In one of the new poems in the book, he summarizes this while talking about a recent fishing excursion. He set two trout eggs on a rock by the river, and while he had his back turned, they were snatched up by an opportunistic gull he hadn’t noticed a moment before:

“Eggs, and no gull noticed,
gull, and no eggs to be seen,
no one’s rights involved,
just, quick as that,
life’s magic
act.”
– Fish Eggs, page 7

I was unfamiliar with Leland Kinsey before this anthology, and I look forward to backtracking through his work in the future. He is a singular poet, deft with his words but aware his greatest asset is the strange and wondrous life he’s lived; he forefronts those experiences over flourishes of language, using his narrative skill to show us a scene, a people, and a place, and he trusts in the raw beauty and grace and pain of those details to do the work for him, which they certainly do.

REBLOGGED FROM:

(Book Review) Galvanized: New and Selected Poems by Leland Kinsey

 

NEWS:
Leland and many of our GWP aithors will be at BOOKSTOCK Literary Festival this summer! You can read about them here: http://bookstockvt.org/2016-presentations/

SummerInternsandFellows
Our interns and summer fellows officially start on Monday!
Please welcome them!

MARGARET SWEENEY, Editorial Intern and Publicity
Processed with VSCO with f2 presetMargaret Sweeney is a native of Brattleboro, Vermont and a recent graduate of Bennington College, where she studied literature and writing. While at Bennington, she interned for the literary organizations Poets House and the Center for the Art of Translation and served as co-editor-in-chief of plain china, the first national anthology of undergraduate student writing. She now lives in Western Massachusetts and works as a part-time bookseller at Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.

JESSICA JAUNDOO, Editorial Intern and Marketing
meJessica is an upcoming sophomore at Bennington College and was born and raised in Boston, MA. She has always had a lifelong interest in nature and her friends always find her trying to adopt any animal or critter into her life. With her interest in the field of Biology and the Environment still in its exploitative stages, her long term hobby has always been writing her own stories and coming up with ideas with friends. Inspiration never fails to strike her at any moment and many who know her are curious to see which book she may publish in the future.

RON ANAHAW, January-February Field Work Intern and 2016 Summer Fellow
RonAnahawRon Anahaw has three things close to his heart: RonAnahawCandid
his loved ones, writing, and Korean fried chicken. With a hand on playwriting, poetry, journalism, and fiction, he considers himself a jack-of-all-trades in writing. He is a big believer in trying to keep the world habitable. He is as quick to crack a joke as he is to ask you to collaborate. Ron is a first-year student at Bennington.

 

KAIYA LEWIS-MARLOW, Editorial Intern
KaiyaLewis-MarlowKaiya is a first term Bennington student with a passion for literature and social change. She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and was raised with close ties to the local farm movement and community there. In her spare time, she enjoys writing speculative fiction, hiking, and making jewelry out of found mechanical objects and polymer clay.

 

KAITLYN  PLUKAS, January-February Field Work Intern and 2016 Summer FellowKaitlynP
Kaitlyn is a first-year student at Bennington College with a passion for any and everything Literature oriented. She firmly believes in the power of literature; both in the way it completely transforms perceptions of the world and in the way it inspires unity amongst communities. Her many years as a Girl Scout and Gold Award recipient have inspired her to enact social and environmental change. Kaitlyn is an avid sock collector, an outdoors adventurer, and is a right-handed writer who is preferential to pens.

Honoring Black History Month

AFricanAmericanHistoryMonth
Here at Green Writers Press, we are busy planning our Spring Book launch set for April 24th at 3:00 PM at Next Stage Arts in Putney. We are also busy celebrating all things African-American and honoring our newest authors who write so eloquently about race and the struggle for equality. We join the Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of African Americans who struggled with adversity to achieve full citizenship in American society.

We’d like to tell you about a few books that we are honored to publish—one is just out this past year, and the other forthcoming in 2016!

9780996135771-PerfecBandCt.inddBlackberries and Cream is the compassionate and insightful story of a young white girl balancing her love for her African-American caregiver and her depressed mother in 1960s Alabama. Full of Southern charm and subtle wisdom, this novel explores the meanings of love, family, and courage in a heartfelt coming-of-age tale that will resonate with children and adults alike. This novel comes at a poignant moment in our society when racial prejudices still linger and the challenges to diversity in children’s literature remain difficult to confront. Blackberries and Cream is perfectly suited to help cultivate awareness about these issues, inspiring meaningful reflection and discussion in young readers. It is 210 pages long and can be considered children’s fiction (middle grade to young adult readers) and historical fiction. We are hoping readers will spread the word. 

Vermont author Leslie Rivver and her best friend, growing up, Ida Bell in Alabama 20 years ago.

Vermont author Leslie Rivver and her best friend, growing up, Ida Bell, in Alabama 20 years ago.

This photo is from twenty years ago, of the author Leslie Rivver and her caregiver Ida Bell, who are the main characters in this semi-autobiographical novel we are promoting during Black History Month. ‪#‎BlackHistoryMonth‬

PRAISE
“Brimming with wisdom and mischief, this tender, heartfelt celebration of an abiding friendship between a white girl and her black caregiver in 1960s Alabama reminds us that the love we experience in childhood has the power to sustain us through a lifetime of change.”
–Irene Latham, author of Leaving Gee’s Bend

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The cover painting is by Clarence Major, entitled “Lady,” 60 x 36 inches; acrylic on canvas.

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We are also thrilled to announce the upcoming story collection by Clarence Major. Chicago Heat and Other Stories employs a gorgeous purity and simplicity of language in a series of masterful analyses examining human interaction. Each narrative voice comes forward all at once, individual and complete, without obstacle or complication, enabling the reader to see the characters and feel their emotions. Major does not shy away from the bitter or the harsh; we get to hear it all. Like paint on an easel he blends lyricality with moxie and the blunt with the beautiful. The characters come together as easily as they part; people leaving, coming back, going, staying—it all sticks and fades like heat on your skin. The imagery is completely accessible and generously given. Toni Morrison comes to mind. His work is like jewels.

Clarence Major’s list of works and achievements is an impressive one. From awards like the Pushcart Prize and National Book Award to fellowships like the Fulbright Fellowship and National Council for the Arts Fellowship, Clarence Major has established himself as a prominent literary figure. Having written more than eight novels, including My Amputations and Dirty Bird Blues, alongside a dozen books of poetry, Chicago Heat and Other Stories is only his second work of short fiction and first book with Green Writers Press.

Clarence Major
CLARENCE MAJOR is a prizewinning short story writer, novelist, poet and painter. As a finalist for the National Book Award he won a Bronze Medal for his book Configurations: New and Selected Poems 1958-1998.  Major was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, The Bay Area Book Reviewers Book Award and The Prix Maurice Coindreau in France. He is the recipient of The Western States Book Award, The National Council on The Arts Award, a New York Cultural Foundation Award, The Stephen Henderson Poetry Award for Outstanding Achievement (African-American Literature and Culture Society of The American Literature Association), the Sister Circle Book Award, two Pushcart prizes, the International Literary Hall of Fame Award (Chicago State University), the 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award in the Fine Arts, presented by the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, and other awards. He is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of California at Davis.

PRAISE FOR THE WORK OF CLARENCE MAJOR
“Clarence Major has a remarkable mind and the talent to match.”     Toni Morrison
“A pioneer on the cutting edge of contemporary fiction.” —Charles Johnson
“[Major’s] language is both lyric and precise. His vision is both humorous . . . and serious.
His story is our own.”                  
National Book Award Finalist/citation for Configurations

“Clarence Major’s… gathering of short stories has extraordinary technical and emotional force, that pushes the form to its contemporary limits without losing contact with its sources in legend, tall-tale, conte, yarn…Major…proves that he is one of only a handful of American writers capable of doing significant work in more than one genre.” —Russell Banks

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Thanks for helping us spread the word about our growing press, especially the authors that help all of us celebrate our freedom and social justice, and foster increased awareness in environmental sustainability. Here is an eloquent quote from Clarence Major in support of our work at the press:

One of the most pressing issues for all of humanity is the environment, namely climate change.  I would like to support efforts to bring about awareness of the problem. We are running out of time. —Clarence Major

 

Our First Newsletter ~ Fall, 2015

Green Writers Press: Giving Voice to Writers & Artists Who Will Make the World a Better Place

Green Writers Press

Green Writers Press

Our fall booksGreen Writers Express include Polly and the One and Only World, Love in the Time of Climate Change, Josie and the Fourth Grade Bike Brigade and Contemporary Vermont Fiction.We are so proud of our books. Please come join us November 9th at Next Stage in Putney, VT for a party to celebrate Contemporary Vermont Fiction with a reading and live music! If you’d like to contribute to that book to help Robin and Dede with expenses, Robin has created a beautiful Indiegogo campaign… The video alone is worth a quick look: www.indiegogo.com/projects/contemporary-vermont-fiction-an-anthology We have had an amazing year here at GWP: The fact that our mission resonates with so many readers of good books is evident wherever we go and via the emails and letters we receive. From the Nantucket Book Festival to Bookstock in Woodstock, VT the Brattleboro Literary Festival and the Northern Woodlands Writers’ Conference, our authors are out there reading, signing books and lending their unique voices to the environmental movement. Many of us were at the Climate March in NYC, too, and we know that there is tremendous momentum in the world to create change! Our press is growing. Thanks for sharing!EVENTS: Brian Adams Book Tour; Don Bredes too! . . . Stay tuned for our 2015 Spring List!
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Copyright © 2014 Green Writers Press
All rights reserved. You are receiving this email because you opted in through email, or at a workshop. Thanks for joining!
Our mailing address is:
Green Writers Press  |  34 Miller Road
West Brattleboro, Vermont 05301
Photos by Dede Cummings
Top: View from the office
Left: GWP poet, Leland Kinsey.Sign up for our monthly news by filling in the form at right! We will keep your email private! 

Growing and Catching Our Breath: “Cli-fi,” A Surprise from Julia Alvarez & More!

IMG_5194.JPGThings at GWP are in full summer bloom, along with the heirloom yellow lilies given to Dede and Robin by Howard Frank Mosher—actually, I should say stolen yellow lilies, for Howard, his wife, Phyllis, and a local woman, now deceased (who was a Kingdom legend and most likely in one of Howard’s stories), snuck over to an abandoned farmhouse and dug up quite a pike if bulbs last fall. Howard brought them down to us as a gift at our inaugural publishing launch!

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Exciting Events coming up….

GWPmagazineCover21042It is an exciting time for GWP! Our new press is growing rapidly, but we need your support. Please visit our donation page if you’d like to donate. Here is some news to share!

We are launching the INAUGURAL print & on-line “GWP | Magazine” at the end of October! Click here for details!
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Readings & News

SoLittleTimeFrontCoverFebReleaseSo Little Time had its inaugural reading at St. Michael’s College in Colchester, Vermont, on January 30th. Here is a gallery of photos of the various poets who read from Gloria Seidler, wife of poet Ralph Culver and a nature photographer as well as a holistic healer. Gloria donated these great photos to us as GWP!

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Ilya Kaminsky, poet of our time, born in Ukraine

Poem by Ilya Kaminsky

A Toast

To your voice, a mysterious virtue,

to the 53 bones of one foot, the four dimensions of breathing,

 

to pine, redwood, sworn fern, peppermint,

to hyacinth and bluebell lily,

 

to the train conductor’s donkey on a rope,

to smells of lemons, a boy pissing splendidly against the trees.

 

Bless each thing on earth until it sickens,

until each ungovernable heart admits: “I confused myself

 

and yet I loved — and what I loved

I forgot, and what I forgot brought glory to my travels,

 

to you I traveled as close as I dared, Lord.”

 

Reprinted courtesy of the author and The Academy of American Poets website www.poets.org 

 

 

 

 

“Is Amazon Bad for Books?”—”Yes it is,” according to Vermont author Howard Frank Mosher

This post is so good, we decided to reblog it here:

In the era of the Kindle, a book costs the same price as a sandwich. Dennis Johnson, an independent publisher, says that “Amazon has successfully fostered the idea that a book is a thing of minimal value—it’s a widget.” Construction by Ian Wright.

In the era of the Kindle, a book costs the same price as a sandwich. Dennis Johnson, an independent publisher, says that “Amazon has successfully fostered the idea that a book is a thing of minimal value—it’s a widget.” Construction by Ian Wright.

There’s an excellent article in the combined Feb. 17 and 24 issues of THE NEW YORKER magazine, by George Packer, called “Cheap Words: Is Amazon’s Business Model Good for Books?”
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Things just keep happening!

A busy time of year you ask?  
SoLittleTimeFrontCoverFebRelease. . . it is, but we are pretty excited here at GWP, with the launch of So Little Time: Words and Images for a World in Climate Crisis. The book just grew, and grew, at the end we added new poems and things got moved around, and the book emerged better and more beautiful than I could have imagined!
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A new book coming out soon!

SoLittleTimeCovSalessmlEdited by Green Writers Press managing editor, Dede Cummings, with a Foreword from John Elder, and poems that feature the work of Greg Delanty, along with quotes from such environmentalists, as BIll McKibbenSo Little Time is an interactive and interpretive book that will inspire, enrich, and a call to action in an urgent plea to stop global warming.
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An Amazing Launch Party—TWO DAYS LEFT ON OUR INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN!

OUR Green Writers Press PUBLISHING LAUNCH PARTY, WITH LIVE MUSIC (from “Red Heart The Ticker,” CAKE, AND AFTER PARTY, WAS HELD FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1ST, AND WAS A HUGE SUCCESS. Thanks to all who came out! We are on our way . . .

Please help us make the dream a reality: Our Fundraising campaign ends IN JUST 2 DAYS—November 7th.  Thanks for sharing & contributing!
Here’s the link: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/green-writers-press

Here are some photos from the party/readings . . . Enjoy and if you can, share this link or the Indiegogo page. WE need to push hard in the next few days, and need everyone’s help! ~ Dede

Making our first film to introduce the new press

Dede writes: I’ve worked on some book trailers before, for some of my author/clients in the publishing business, most notably for David Blistein and his book, David’s Inferno. For that book trailer, I got to go to help set it up and work on the story board, and attend the filming, which was at Ken Burns’ Florentine Films in New Hampshire (not far from where I live in Brattleboro).

It was “wicked” exciting to be there, hanging out with one of my heroes, well, Dave, my client, but KEN BURNS! I think Ken’s work is brilliant….. so, in any event, I was suitably inspired last night when I went to hear Ken give a talk and presentation for his new PBS series, The Roosevelts. In fact, I was so inspired, I went home and made this video so that we can raise tons of money and pay our printing bill for The Bird Book, So Little Time, and The Beavers of Popple’s Pond… If we raise even half of our $20,000 goal, we will be in good shape, so I am hoping for $10,000. Maybe, just maybe, this little earnest film—with my son, Sam Carmichael, playing an original composition on the guitar….will bring us there!

Here it is, and tell us what you think? I already got feedback on the bad sound quality 🙂 Going to try to fix that or rerecord… Please share! We will list your name on our site as supporter if you donate, too! Our big party is November 1st, Putney, Vermont at Next Stage Arts Project!

Respects for Seamus Heaney & Our First Book is Printing in Vermont Today

63133 DC Design_cvr.pdf.pdf

I feel like a mother about to have a baby—the excitement, the collaboration between publisher-printer-artist-writer—is everything I dreamed about when I started this publishing company! I want to thank the many supporters along the way, especially the people who don’t think I am crazy, and have celebrated the idea of a publisher working in harmony with the earth’s resources.
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Exciting new book signed from GWP!

WHY I RIDE: Because a Bike Pedal Lasts Longer Than a Gas Tank by British Slam Poet, Hollie McNish

WHYIRDIEcovPage to Performance, a poetry organization based in Cambridge, UK and led by Hollie McNish and Inja, worked with a group of amazing young people for three months in summer, 2013, to find out what it is they all love about riding.
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