Tag Archives: bookstores

We Are Vermont! An Activist Calendar for 2018 is Here!

Our Calendar is a 100% donation to 350-Vermont! Thanks to all our photographers who donated their work! Conceived by Nancy Braus, GWP advisory board and owner of Everyone’s Books in Brattleboro. Our paper is Reincarnation, made from 100% recycled content waste, bleached without the use of chlorine compounds and printed locally in Vermont by Springfield Printing Company, using soy-based ink.

We are Vermont! is a calendar created to benefit 350Vermont. Our goal is to share the creativity, passion,  diversity, and progressive activism of Vermonters through beautiful color images donated by talented photographers. We will feature images of organic farms, farmers’ gardens, protests for climate and migrant justice, renewable energy, our outspoken and brave progressive elected officials, the women’s march, the 2016 pipeline protests, and more.

“Empathy: We are committed to practicing empathy; we engage comrades with the intent to learn about and connect with their contexts.” —from Guiding Principles of Black Lives Matter

Nothing like this exists in Vermont, as all the currently available calendars are comprised of images of scenery, either in photographs or in artwork. We plan to offer this calendar for sale through book stores, gift stores, through 350Vermont, and at events this fall. This will be an exciting and well received project.

Call for submissions for 2019:
We will be beginning to collect images for the 2019 ‘We are Vermont’ Calendar in January 2018. We know Vermonters will be busy growing food, enjoying the nature of our beautiful state, working to make our communities more welcoming and livable, finding innovative ways to lead in the fight for climate justice, and creatively resisting the conservative minority who are trying to reshape our country.  We hope to hear from some of the many talented photographers documenting our lives and work. If you wish your images to be a part of this exciting fund raiser for 350 Vermont, contact us at wearevermont@gmail.com.

We also would love your input. How can this calendar be more beautiful and more useful as a tool to help us work together to create a healthier, more sustainable, and more joyful state and world.

“To change everything, we need everyone.”—Naomi Klein

Resources:
Visit 350vermont.org to learn more about the many ways that you can get involved. From there you can join in the fight for climate justice and sign up as a volunteer to help in our mission to end the carbon crisis. In addition, there are numerous other environmental and agricultural organizations throughout the state that are working just as hard to find bold solutions for climate change and the many other pressing issues that we face today. To get involved locally, let your voice be heard. Find out if your Vermont town has an energy committee where you can let town officials know of the necessity of transitioning to a renewable economy. Finally, you can write letters to your local media and call your representatives; you can also help by gleaning after the harvest to give food to the local food shelf.350-VERMONT MISSION: 350VT organizes, educates, and supports people in Vermont to work for climate justice —resisting fossil fuels, building alternatives, and transforming our communities for greater justice and resilience. 

Orders: wearevermontcalendar@gmail.com or call Everyone’s Books at 802-254-8160
Bulk orders accepted, too! 

Front cover photo by Terry Allen.

Ambassadors, Advocates, and Librarians

What I took from my 5 Days at ALA Chicago Conference
by Lydia Golitz, GWP Summer Intern

Thanks to the incredible Dede Cummings, I was able attend the American Library Association’s annual conference from June 22 to June 27. This summer, it was held in Chicago, where I live and intern remotely for GWP. I was sent to do many things, among them: to learn how to be in conversation with libraries and educators, to spread the word about one of GWP’s upcoming release, Salamander Sky, and explore all the fun things ALA has to offer. I had a blast, all while gathering information and inspiration left and right.

Of all the incredible people I encountered at ALA, two really, genuinely, impacted me. One was Gene Luen Yang, and the other was Hillary Clinton. They were both featured speakers who really encapsulated what I feel is so important about what—and how!—we read.

Gene Luen Yang is an accomplished graphic novelist whose works center around the Asian-American experience. All of his work, especially his most accomplished pieces: American Born Chinese, and The New Superman, have inspired conversations about diversity in literature. In a moment of illumination, Yang spoke about what it means to be an “ambassador” and what it means to be an “advocate.” Ambassadors are people (authors, characters, readers) who relay other’s experiences in an empathetic way, and advocacy is sharing stories that speak to experiences representative of your own. In this way, Yang said, ambassadors teach you how to love others, and advocates teach you how to love yourself. And literature should do just that—create an empathy for others, while empowering the reader to be true to themselves in a noble way. His talk highlighted the importance of representation, and that anyone, from any background, race, or gender, is capable of doing anything, including being both an ambassador and an advocate. And one essential way in inspiring that inclusion is being able to see characters just like them in the stories they read.

. . . it is clear that “access equals opportunity,” books are of the UTMOST importance in every community.

Hillary Clinton spoke to the importance of representation as well, taking it a step farther in talking about how these books reach people everyday. Because it is clear that “access equals opportunity,” books are of the UTMOST importance in every community. With the help of free, instructional libraries, books can be endlessly accessed and open everyone to limitless opportunity through knowledge and empowerment. She also spoke to the importance of how we read. In the age of “fake news” and “alternative facts” it is more important than ever to be a critical reader. Clinton emphasized that libraries and books are the things that encourage and teach that critical reading and media literacy, and are therefore indispensable right now, and for our future.

Just from my short 6 weeks here at GWP, I can tell that all of these commitments are also central to what GWP strives to do. As people who write, read, and love books, we hold so much power in our world and in our own local communities to change perceptions and start important conversations through literature, poetry, and art. Interested in libraries, outreach, or changing the world? Start conversations with your local branch, your local bookstore, your local educators, readers, and writers. If you’re looking for just a good place to start reading, check out GWP’s own authors, who are all so committed to changing the world for the better, through advocacy for the environment.

Weneeddiversebooks.org and reading-without-walls.com are also good resources to help us expose ourselves to literature we might not even think about looking for. Though it can be a hefty challenge to read outside of the box, I believe it is one of the most important ones we have the privilege to participate in. Happy reading!

 

 

—Lydia Golitz,
GWP Summer Editorial Intern
Bennington College

Our GWP Island Author Takes On Frankenfish!

BIG NEWS TODAY for one of our authors!

With the current controversy over the introduction of genetically engineered salmon—dubbed ‘Frankenfish’—the publication of Your Own Ones, by Prince Edward Island author, Dr. Síle Post, couldn’t be more timely.

Your Own Ones illustrates the Thoreauvian maxim:

In Wildness is the preservation of the world, (where)
All good things are wild and free.

Based on empirical research (from the findings of a Canadian risk assessment team, as well as additional studies) into the potential threats, both to human and wild salmon health, of farmed and genetically modified salmon, Your Own Ones chronicles the ecological, biological, and cultural importance of protecting wild salmon from the threat posed by salmon farms and frankenfish.

When protagonist, P.E. Islander Wild Salmon Conservationist, Dr. Áine O’Connor, learns of the sudden, inexplicable death of her aunt, she discovers the existence of Mad Salmon Disease, a devastating disease attributed to the consumption of farmed salmon, and it is feared, genetically engineered salmon. Set in two places abundant in wild salmon, Prince Edward Island and Dingle Peninsula, Ireland, Your Own Ones chronicles the initiatives of the leading characters in the novel to challenge the initiatives of both governments to introduce salmon farms as well as genetically engineered salmon to the human food chain.

YourOwnOnesFrontCoverMKTThe Bookmark, Charlottetown, PE, will host a book launch and reading, May 5, 2016 from 11:30-1:00 p.m. at its Charlottetown Store, located at Confederation Court Mall, 172 Queen Street.  Contact Lori Cheverie for further details at: lori@bookmarkreads.ca .

SPECS
5.25 x 8; Paperback Original
386 pages; $19.95
ISBN: 978-0-9961357-3-3 (pbk)
Available wherever books are sold.
Distributed by Midpoint Trade Books, Ingram’s, Baker & Taylor.

 

 

About the Author: SilePostAuthorPhoto
Author, Síle Post, PhD, a former university professor and literary cultural scholar, is the author of two novels, published with Green Writers Press: Your Own Ones and The Road to Walden North. She resides in Prince Edward Island, where she sits on the Board of the MacPhail Homestead Foundation, as well as in northern New England, where she serves as an active member of the Thoreau Society. For interviews and events, please contact the author at (silepost@ymail.com).

 

Bodies of Mothers Wins Top Printing Award

pinnacle-awardThe Printing Industries of New England (PINE), a major trade group that has been around in one form or another since 1887, recently presented our Vermont printer, Springfield Printing Corporation, with three awards as part of their 2015 Awards of Excellence Competition. The competition was stiff; they were up against 40 companies from all over New England, who submitted over 300 entries.

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Our First High School Intern & News

LindseyVachonHSInternGWPLindsey Vachon is Green Writers Press’ first high school intern. She is a junior at Leland and Gray Union High School in Townshend, Vermont, where she lives, and hopes to learn everything there is to learn about writing and the publishing world. She loves writing, mostly fiction, and besides that, has a love for creating pottery, traveling and learning about the stars. Please welcome the talented and wonderful, Lindsey Vachon!

Lindsey is helping to edit this young adult/middle grade reader fiction coming out in May, The Order of the Trees.TheOrderoftheTreesFrontCover

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“Is Amazon Bad for Books?”—”Yes it is,” according to Vermont author Howard Frank Mosher

This post is so good, we decided to reblog it here:

In the era of the Kindle, a book costs the same price as a sandwich. Dennis Johnson, an independent publisher, says that “Amazon has successfully fostered the idea that a book is a thing of minimal value—it’s a widget.” Construction by Ian Wright.

In the era of the Kindle, a book costs the same price as a sandwich. Dennis Johnson, an independent publisher, says that “Amazon has successfully fostered the idea that a book is a thing of minimal value—it’s a widget.” Construction by Ian Wright.

There’s an excellent article in the combined Feb. 17 and 24 issues of THE NEW YORKER magazine, by George Packer, called “Cheap Words: Is Amazon’s Business Model Good for Books?”
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Happy Holidays from Green Writers Press

Our Radio Show/PODCASTS

Vermont author, Howard Frank Mosher, and publisher, Dede Cummings, commenced the first-ever “Author-New Publisher Tour of Vermont Bookstores.” This trip was Howard’s idea. “Why not tour the bookstores, take the pulse of book selling in Vermont, see what people are reading and buying, and just talk on the way,” he asked me, ending with a chuckle. As we drove, I held the mic and asked him to tell me some stories. This is the first of 4 Podcasts. Enjoy, and Happy Holidays from Green Writers Press!

LISTEN HERE

PHOTOS FROM THE ROAD TRIP: