Category Archives: Publishing News

One Man’s Maine, Essays


We love this review of our newest nonfiction collection of essays written by Left Bank Books in Belfast Maine.

Dear Friends,

If you are now readying your guest room for the annual influx of summer visitors, you need to come to our shop. . . To pick up a copy of the newly released One Man’s Maine: Essays on a Love Affair, because this book is the book you’re going to want on your guests’ bedside table (as well as on yours) this summer (and beyond).

Truth be told, when we first heard about “another” book of essays that professes a love affair with Maine, we were a bit skeptical. Didn’t E.B. White do that rather well in One Man’s Meat? But then we read the Dedication page of Jim’s book, in which he more than “nods” to White’s classic collection:

In homage to E.B. White, whose delight in the ordinary, compassion in the face of chaos, and comfort in his own skin can only be imitated, never equaled.

. . .and we knew we were on to something good. And boy, is this collection good! It’s good not “just because” Jim is a fine writer. He is. What makes this collection special is that Jim knows the natural world well and has years of experience writing about the wonders and challenges of Maine’s environment. Together, his talent and knowledge shine in this series of essays that are arranged in a singular style.

One Man’s Maine is organized into 16 pairs of essays. The first in each addresses Maine’s natural icons—lobster, moose, blueberries, lupine, elvers—while the second looks at matters of larger human significance, such as science and belief, observation and emotion. It is a concept that works exceedingly well in large part because Jim has had a 30-year career in science publishing and because he has a gentle, wry sense of humor that shines throughout his writing. His daughter Emma is equally talented—she drew accompanying illustrations for each essay.

Note:A portion of book sales will benefit Coastal Mountains Land Trust, where Jim is President of the Board of Directors. 

One Man’s Maine: Essays on a Love Affair by Jim Kroschell is available nationwide whereever books or sold. 

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B U Y   N O W

2017 Green Earth Book Award “Long List” Announced

2017 Green Earth Book Award “Long List” Announced — Brattleboro, Vermont
indie publisher has 3 titles on the list!

Geen Writers Press has recently been notified that three of our children’s books from the Sprouts for Kids Children’s Book line have been long listed for a national award for environmental stewardship in publishing, the 2017 Green Earth Book Award. The Nature Generation created the Green Earth Book Award to promote books that inspire children to grow a deeper appreciation, respect, and responsibility for their natural environment. This is an annual award for books that best raise awareness of the beauty of our natural world and the responsibility we have to protect it.

The Green Earth Book Award recognizes books in five categories – Picture Book, Children’s Fiction, Children’s Nonfiction, Young Adult Fiction, and Young Adult Nonfiction. In each category, the author/illustrator are awarded $1,500.  The winners will be announced on Earth Day, April 22, 2017.

1. Broken Wing

Green Writers Press has recently published Broken Wing posthumously by celebrated Vermont poet David Budbill. Broken Wing is the story of one man’s love for birds and efforts to save a rusty blackbird that can’t fly south for the winter. The author worked closely with publisher Dede Cummings in order to finish the book before he died in late September of this year. The publisher enlisted local artist Donald Saaf, who illustrated the pages with stunning black and white collages that bring the book to life. The book is appropriate for young adult readers and adults. In Broken Wing, David Budbill has composed a monumental love letter to the natural world, an astute and minutely observed portrait of the avian inhabitants of a mysterious hillside orchard. The Man Who Lives Alone in the Mountains, a reclusive keeper of the earth whose soul is devoted to one injured rusty blackbird, embodies a narrative voice compelled to witness, in the rhythm and brutality of the seasons, the intimate patterns of the wild creatures surrounding his home. Budbill’s lyrical storytelling effortlessly transports the reader into his realm with a rare and poetic beauty.

2. KABOOM!

KABOOM! is the candidly comical and dynamic story of Cyndie and Ashley, two spunky and spirited teens from coal country West Virginia, who become activists overnight when their beloved mountain is threatened by Big Coal. This expertly crafted coming of age and rise to activism novel tracks the girls’ experience as they start their own club, Kids Against Blowing Off Our Mountaintops, as they explore the power of grassroots activism, and even as they both begin to fall in love for the first time.  KABOOM!, published on Earth Day (April 22, 2016) by Green Writers Press, utilizes humorous narration and the lively dialogue of impassioned characters to make serious environmental issues more accessible for adolescents. This Young Adult novel can be categorized as a Romantic Comedy “Cli-Fi” (Climate Fiction), one sure to inspire teens to evoke positive change in the world around them.

 The author, Brian Adams, is a recently retired professor Emeritus of Environmental Science at Greenfield Community College in western Massachusetts. His first novel, Love in the Time of Climate Change, was a Foreword Reviews IndieFAB Gold Medal Winner for Humor. He is active in the environmental movement and now devotes his time to writing romantic comedies centered on environmental activism. Brian lives with his wife in Northampton, Massachusetts.

2. Did Tiger Take the Rain?

Charles Norris-Brown was born in the small town of Warren, Pennsylvania. He completed a PhD degree in Social Anthropology and Sociology at Lund University, Sweden, in 1984, based on fieldwork in the inner hills of Uttarakhand, India. His other research his took him from India to the rainforest of Borneo, and to forest communities in eastern Canada and the Appalachian region of the USA. While visiting the Corbett National Park in India, he decided to combine his art, anthropology, and concern for the environment to focus on writing and illustrating children’s books. In time, he would visit western Nepal in 2011 and 2012, and develop what would become his first children’s book, Did Tiger Take the Rain?, an exquisitely told and illustrated tale of a Himalayan land without rain, of frightened farmers, and of courageous girls who go into the forest seeking an answer from the tiger they believe has stopped the rain out of anger. As one of the girls, Anjali, learns, ‘We all live under the same sky.’ The combination of gorgeous watercolors, a forest adventure, and the notion that children can act to make life better, creates a vibrant emotional message that welcomes multiple readings.

Review copies available upon request by contacting the publisher or distributor.  Authors and artists are available for interviews (David Budbill’s daughter, Nadine Budbill, is the spokesperson for her father).

Upcoming spring titles include: Horse-Drawn Yogurt: Stories from Total Loss Farm by Vermont legend and communard, Peter Gould; One Man’s Maine by environmental essayist, Jim Kroschell; A Field Guide to Murder and Fly Fishing by fiction writer Tim Weed; Walking Through the Seasons: Observations and Reflections by Marilyn Neagley; Learning to See in Three Dimensions by Pamela Spiro Wagner; Roads Taken: Contemporary Vermont Poetry edited by Chard deNiord and Sydney Lea with an introduction by Dan Chiasson; Last Correspondence poems by Leland Kinsey, edited by Howard Frank Mosher; Clothesline Religion poetry by Megan Buchana; and for Children: Josie Meets a Jaguar, Book 2 in the Josie Goes Green Series by Beth Handman and the Bruno family of Brooklyn, NY. 

April 7th, at Next Stage Arts in Putney, Vermont, the press will be featured at the annual Earth Day celebration and reading.

OF NOTE: Our children’s picture book, Ralph Flies the Coop, will be “flying” to the Bologna International Children’s Book Fair this spring.

All titles are distributed by Midpoint Trade Books, New York and Tennessee and available wherever books are sold.

Green Writers Press is a Vermont-based, global publisher whose mission is to spread a message of hope and renewal. Read more at http://www.greenwriterspress.com.

Thank you for helping us spread the word!

Press News: Two GWP books win gold IndieFAB awards & More!

13521917_10153924992944682_7112678663056434097_nThis is amazing news—announced today at the American Library Association Annual Conference in Orlando! TWO of our authors from Green Writers Press have won gold for Foreword Review’s IndieFAB Book of the Year!

Congrats to Lauren Alderfer and Leslie Rivver.

 

 

 

13507044_10153936603769682_7379336670217781751_nAlso, this award was just announced:

M JACKSON just WON The 2016 Green Prize for Sustainable Literature from t13510815_10153936603784682_7884590368170981387_nhe City of Santa Monica’s Office of Sustainability and the Environment along with the Santa Monica Public Library! They want her to come to Santa Monica September 22nd to accept the award!! The evening program will feature Eames Demetrios, grandson of Ray and Charles Eames (of the chair fame!).

13567309_10153932248774682_1957763216750489960_nMore great news from one of our GWP authors:

Clarence Major is getting booked for his October New England Book Tour—October 15: Brattleboro Literary Festival; October 17: Harvard Coop Bookstore, with an introduction by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. 7PM reading, October 18: Emerson College morning reading, ETC.

More to come: Willem Lange selected to be featured speaker at NEIBA’s Fall Conference!

 

A Vermont Poet Shines Forth & Welcome New Interns & Summer Fellows

(Book Review)
Galvanized: New and Selected Poems by Leland Kinsey

By David Nilsen

galvanizedGalvanized, the new collection from Vermont poet Leland Kinsey, is a document of the hardship and rough-hewn beauty of living close to the land, in reach of its temper but also its embrace. Kinsey grew up on a Vermont farm, the child of a long line of such folk who clung to existence in the face of a cold north wind, working impossibly hard because to do less was to starve. These poems–some new, most from his seven previous books since 1991–are more closely tied to a particular place than any others I’ve read, and bring Vermont into a vivid focus, painting a landscape and a way of life I had never associated with the state.

Kinsey’s poems are beautiful but brutal pastorales, uncompromising in their depictions of the strain and heartache of living off the land. At times these poems feel like catalogs of woe, running through lists of injuries and tragedies, but they are never self-pitying, and they are never dishonest. The occasional joys of such hard lives are also given their turn, from necessary late night swims in glacial ponds to wash off the sweat and chaff after a day of baling, to summer baseball games, to barn dances to thank the neighbors for helping rebuild a burnt down farm building. Kinsey remembers sledding as a child, the near-suicidal danger of this diversion, the danger less impending than that of their farm work because it was chosen:

“We mostly slid at night to tell
if cars were coming,
no stopping at the corner
except by ditching at forty miles and hour,
blood and fractures either way.”
– page 97

More than anything, these poems chronicle survival, an endeavor that for Kinsey’s family was often a fraught and unforgiving one, but one that laid down from time to time in the shadow of joy. There is a wry humor underlying much of this poetry, rarely spotlighted but often teasing at the edges of harder truths, a humor that undoubtedly served its own role in the family’s endurance. In “Riding in the Open,” Kinsey recalls countless rides on top of farm loads in his youth, experiences that were sometimes fun, a chance to rest, and sometimes quite dangerous, and often both:

“I think of how we mostly could not talk,
mouths agape,
cheeks puffed out by the force of wind,
any conversation blown back passed us,
ears wind stopped,
and of the holding on,
and in the face of the black despair
we were all prone to,
wild laughter.”
– page 96

There is a section of the book containing poems from his 2004 collection In the Rain Shadow, a series of poems he wrote during his extended visit with his cousin in Tanzania. These poems present a jarring change of landscape and culture initially, but it quickly becomes apparent to the reader–as it did to the poet–how much there is in common between the experience the inhabitants of this impoverished nation have had in trying to scrape a living from the harsh African environment and the struggle Kinsey’s own family and ancestors had in prying a living from the glacier-scoured hills of northern Vermont.

Galvanized concludes with selections from Kinsey’s most recent collection, 2014’s Winter Ready. Living as close to (and off of) the land as Kinsey and his family have, many of his poems deal with the seasons, the heavens’ rationing of sunshine and rain, and the cruelties and wonders of winter, but this final section hones in on the way the calendar in a cold-weather climate bends around the gravity well of winter. Spring is about escaping it and planting as soon as the ground warms. In summer it can almost be forgotten as crops grow high and the sun beats down. But by fall, everyone knows what’s coming. Crops are gathered, wood is chopped, repairs are made, food is laid in. Winter will spare no one who isn’t ready. These poems perfectly encapsulate the simple clarity with which Kinsey documents the hardship of living as he and his family have, wasting little regret or resentment over the fairness of their lives. There simply isn’t time for it, and nature is as unforgiving with human life as it is with animal. In one of the new poems in the book, he summarizes this while talking about a recent fishing excursion. He set two trout eggs on a rock by the river, and while he had his back turned, they were snatched up by an opportunistic gull he hadn’t noticed a moment before:

“Eggs, and no gull noticed,
gull, and no eggs to be seen,
no one’s rights involved,
just, quick as that,
life’s magic
act.”
– Fish Eggs, page 7

I was unfamiliar with Leland Kinsey before this anthology, and I look forward to backtracking through his work in the future. He is a singular poet, deft with his words but aware his greatest asset is the strange and wondrous life he’s lived; he forefronts those experiences over flourishes of language, using his narrative skill to show us a scene, a people, and a place, and he trusts in the raw beauty and grace and pain of those details to do the work for him, which they certainly do.

REBLOGGED FROM:

(Book Review) Galvanized: New and Selected Poems by Leland Kinsey

 

NEWS:
Leland and many of our GWP aithors will be at BOOKSTOCK Literary Festival this summer! You can read about them here: http://bookstockvt.org/2016-presentations/

SummerInternsandFellows
Our interns and summer fellows officially start on Monday!
Please welcome them!

MARGARET SWEENEY, Editorial Intern and Publicity
Processed with VSCO with f2 presetMargaret Sweeney is a native of Brattleboro, Vermont and a recent graduate of Bennington College, where she studied literature and writing. While at Bennington, she interned for the literary organizations Poets House and the Center for the Art of Translation and served as co-editor-in-chief of plain china, the first national anthology of undergraduate student writing. She now lives in Western Massachusetts and works as a part-time bookseller at Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.

JESSICA JAUNDOO, Editorial Intern and Marketing
meJessica is an upcoming sophomore at Bennington College and was born and raised in Boston, MA. She has always had a lifelong interest in nature and her friends always find her trying to adopt any animal or critter into her life. With her interest in the field of Biology and the Environment still in its exploitative stages, her long term hobby has always been writing her own stories and coming up with ideas with friends. Inspiration never fails to strike her at any moment and many who know her are curious to see which book she may publish in the future.

RON ANAHAW, January-February Field Work Intern and 2016 Summer Fellow
RonAnahawRon Anahaw has three things close to his heart: RonAnahawCandid
his loved ones, writing, and Korean fried chicken. With a hand on playwriting, poetry, journalism, and fiction, he considers himself a jack-of-all-trades in writing. He is a big believer in trying to keep the world habitable. He is as quick to crack a joke as he is to ask you to collaborate. Ron is a first-year student at Bennington.

 

KAIYA LEWIS-MARLOW, Editorial Intern
KaiyaLewis-MarlowKaiya is a first term Bennington student with a passion for literature and social change. She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and was raised with close ties to the local farm movement and community there. In her spare time, she enjoys writing speculative fiction, hiking, and making jewelry out of found mechanical objects and polymer clay.

 

KAITLYN  PLUKAS, January-February Field Work Intern and 2016 Summer FellowKaitlynP
Kaitlyn is a first-year student at Bennington College with a passion for any and everything Literature oriented. She firmly believes in the power of literature; both in the way it completely transforms perceptions of the world and in the way it inspires unity amongst communities. Her many years as a Girl Scout and Gold Award recipient have inspired her to enact social and environmental change. Kaitlyn is an avid sock collector, an outdoors adventurer, and is a right-handed writer who is preferential to pens.

Our GWP Island Author Takes On Frankenfish!

BIG NEWS TODAY for one of our authors!

With the current controversy over the introduction of genetically engineered salmon—dubbed ‘Frankenfish’—the publication of Your Own Ones, by Prince Edward Island author, Dr. Síle Post, couldn’t be more timely.

Your Own Ones illustrates the Thoreauvian maxim:

In Wildness is the preservation of the world, (where)
All good things are wild and free.

Based on empirical research (from the findings of a Canadian risk assessment team, as well as additional studies) into the potential threats, both to human and wild salmon health, of farmed and genetically modified salmon, Your Own Ones chronicles the ecological, biological, and cultural importance of protecting wild salmon from the threat posed by salmon farms and frankenfish.

When protagonist, P.E. Islander Wild Salmon Conservationist, Dr. Áine O’Connor, learns of the sudden, inexplicable death of her aunt, she discovers the existence of Mad Salmon Disease, a devastating disease attributed to the consumption of farmed salmon, and it is feared, genetically engineered salmon. Set in two places abundant in wild salmon, Prince Edward Island and Dingle Peninsula, Ireland, Your Own Ones chronicles the initiatives of the leading characters in the novel to challenge the initiatives of both governments to introduce salmon farms as well as genetically engineered salmon to the human food chain.

YourOwnOnesFrontCoverMKTThe Bookmark, Charlottetown, PE, will host a book launch and reading, May 5, 2016 from 11:30-1:00 p.m. at its Charlottetown Store, located at Confederation Court Mall, 172 Queen Street.  Contact Lori Cheverie for further details at: lori@bookmarkreads.ca .

SPECS
5.25 x 8; Paperback Original
386 pages; $19.95
ISBN: 978-0-9961357-3-3 (pbk)
Available wherever books are sold.
Distributed by Midpoint Trade Books, Ingram’s, Baker & Taylor.

 

 

About the Author: SilePostAuthorPhoto
Author, Síle Post, PhD, a former university professor and literary cultural scholar, is the author of two novels, published with Green Writers Press: Your Own Ones and The Road to Walden North. She resides in Prince Edward Island, where she sits on the Board of the MacPhail Homestead Foundation, as well as in northern New England, where she serves as an active member of the Thoreau Society. For interviews and events, please contact the author at (silepost@ymail.com).

 

Spring News for March 2016

We are a growing Vermont publisher with exciting news to share!

9780996135771-PerfecBandCt.inddBlackberries and Cream ~ a Classic Children’s Novel from Green Writers Press Selected for the Alabama Book Festival and named a finalist for the Foreword Review’s IndieFAB Book of the Year

Other news on upcoming books:

Clarence MajorHaving written more than eight novels, including My Amputations and Dirty Bird Blues, alongside a dozen books of poetry, Chicago Heat and Other Stories is Clarence Major’s second work of short fiction and first book with Green Writers Press is coming out September 6, 2016. Here is a quote from Clarence—and we are honored to be his publisher!

At the same time one of the most pressing issues for all of humanity is the environment, namely climate change. I would like to support efforts to bring about awareness of the problem. We are running out of time. —Clarence Major

And last, but not least: We are so excited about Green Writers Press having 5 finalists in the annual Foreword Reviews IndieFAB Book of the Year Awards:

Richard Jarrette, A Hundred Million Years of Nectar Dances—Poetry
M Jackson, While Glaciers Slept: Being Human in a Time of Climate Change—Memoir
Lauren Alderfer, Teaching from the Heart of MindfulnessEducation
Leslie Rivver, Blackberries and Cream—Juvenile Fiction
Sydney Lea, What’s the Story? Reflections on a Life Grown Long—Essays

“The 2015 INDIEFAB finalist selection process is as inspiring as it is rigorous,” said Victoria Sutherland, publisher of Foreword Reviews magazine. “The strength of this list of finalists is further proof that small, independent publishers are taking their rightful place as the new driving force of the entire publishing industry.”

GWPIndieFabFinalists

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Please welcome, ANNA MULLEN, Marketing and Outreach Coordinator, Assistant Editor!

AnnaMullenAnna is a poet, naturalist, and aspiring morning person from the suburban foothills of the North Carolina Appalachians. She has special love for writings about the sea, speculative fiction, animal consciousness, psychologies of climate change, and queer ecology. She studied Environmental Literature at Middlebury College and as a poetry fellow at Bread Loaf Orion’s Environmental Writers’ Conference. Most recently she served as Treleven, Inc.’s writer-in-residence, working on poetic and scientific sketches of their sheep flock in New Haven, VT.

Thanks for taking the time to help support our growing list!

We are dedicated to the “LOCALVORE” movement in bookselling.

 

Our New Poetry Editor and News

IMG_1340.JPG

Please welcome Sierra Dickey! She joins editors John Tiholitz, Jenna Gersie and Rose Alexandre-Leach.

Sierra Dickey is a young writer and editor native to Cape Cod, Massachusetts with auxiliary roots in the Northeast Kingdom. In 2015, she graduated from Whitman College, where her honors thesis on ecofeminist literature was the recipient of the Linda Meyer Award for Best Environmental Essay. She is passionate about both print and digital media, as well as long walks and good coffee. Continue reading

Notes from June, 2015

And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.
—John Donne

~~~~

Greetings to our Green Writers Press Community,

My daughter, Emma, is doing okay after such a tough car accident June 4th. Next Thursday, I will help get her settled in an outpatient rehab apartment in NYC. I am in awe of her strength and so proud of her spirit—her cousin, Molly, a junior high English teacher at Horace Mann, is also doing well, and both girls will be walking after Labor Day! I am trying my best to get things back up to speed with the press and it is going well—it is great to be back at work after a month spent at Yale-New Haven Hospital. I am so fortunate to be part of a community of understanding writers, editors, printers, and readers! Our books may be a bit delayed—but not by much! The big news is I have the help and support of two fabulous interns, An Nguyen (from Bennington College) and Flannery Wiest (Smith College). Thanks to everyone for the prayers, meditations, thoughts and kind words.
—Dede

Here is what Flannery has to say about becoming an intern with the press, and how she got here:

~~~~~

Flannery Wiest, GWP summer editorial intern, has a nice view from her daily reading in Northampton, Mass.

Flannery Wiest, GWP summer editorial intern, has a nice view from her daily reading in Northampton, Mass.

Continue reading

Our Summer Locavore Book CSA & Some New Faces

ALEX FISCHER, from Brattleboro, is our new bookkeeper

AlexFischerAfter years of organic farming and working as a bookkeeper, Alex decided to take the plunge and start Open Bookkeeping. The business is rooted in the values and experiences learned from social justice organizing and managing the finances of small businesses and nonprofits.  Alex holds an MBA in Managing for Sustainability from Marlboro Graduate School in Brattleboro, VT. Grounded in past experiences on farms, at farmers markets and in restaurants, Alex understands the reality facing small business owners and sees the need for innovative and alternative business models, such as Community Supported Businesses (ie CSA farms), worker owned cooperatives and other vertically integrated structures. In Vermont, Alex co-founded HomoPromo, a queer events promotion collective, volunteers with Vermont Worker’s Center and Migrant Justice and facilitates anti-oppression and anti-racism workshops and trainings.Carley, Dede’s rescue dog is already excited to have Alex on board!  Continue reading

A Climate Fiction/CliFi “Bromance”

Review of Love in the Time of Climate Change by Brian Adams 

by Sage Kalmus

  

 

Twice while starting Brian Adams’ Love in the Time of Climate Change I had to pause and review the book jacket to make sure it was indeed a work of fiction I was reading. Sure enough, there I saw it each time, on the cover in small print beside the author’s name, the definitive declaration: “a novel.” Yet mine was an easy mistake to make, as the book begins with an expository—if cheeky—primer on what’s later referred to as “The Issue.” Then again, isn’t this how so many novels start: by setting the scene for the tale to come? In this case it just so happens to be the backdrop of global warming.

The true start of the novel opens on Day One of the new semester at a small community college in western Massachusetts, as our narrator, Casey, an environmental studies professor, prepares to greet his new group of students. He begins, he tells the reader, the same as he has every previous semester: by revealing to his class his debilitating illness, Obsessive Climate Disorder (OCD.) Little does our quixotic narrator know that in this particular class is one student with the power to help him, if not cure his disease, then certainly ameliorate its symptoms. And it is these symptoms of Professor Casey’s self-diagnosed OCD that we witness him suffer through as he attempts to win hearts and change minds: one heart and mind, as he’s soon to discover, in particular.

An early clue that this book is more than just a thinly disguised sermon on the mount comes when two of the students in Casey’s extra-curricular group, The Climate Changers, get into an embittered battle over which of them is the more tenacious bicyclist. Clearly saving the world poses the possibly greater threat of ego annihilation (as in annihilating the world with one’s own ego.) It doesn’t take long to realize this story is far more about the struggle an individual goes through to live from day to day in the face of a damning reality than it is an attempt to educate an audience who likely already knows much of what he speaks. To simply say the author here is preaching to the converted would be disingenuous because he’s not preaching: he’s satirizing. He simply happens to be satirizing his own deeply held beliefs. This makes for some rather bold self-deprecating humor. For example, when a student comes to his office alarmed from her newfound awareness of our true environmental condition, Casey reacts at first  with self-satisfaction, thinking, “Yes! Got ’em!” followed immediately thereafter by, “Of course, what this really means is that they’re now doomed for a lifetime of extreme anxiety, possible depression, constant angst, and a whole host of other intellectual trauma…But hey, such is the price of education. Right?”

In such ways this novel often seems a case study on contradiction, on collateral hypocrisy, on trying to “walk the walk”, to “practice what you preach” in a world that makes such feats prohibitive. Thus we witness Casey forced by circumstance to patronize his Corporate Enemy #1: Walmart, only to create a self-fulfilling prophecy of humiliation while inside. Throughout Casey’s misadventures I was often reminded of the myth of Sisyphus, doomed to forever roll his boulder up a hill only to find that, just when he gets it near the top, it rolls past him all the way to the bottom again.

Likewise love, Casey finds, is not without its Sysiphusian hurdles, in this case that the object of his affections is also a student. Never mind that she is a peer in age, and even a fellow teacher, of youngsters, and at an entirely different school to boot. Casey’s professional moral code is as strict as his climatological one. Of course, all codes are meant to be tested, and indeed it is watching Casey butt up against these imperious standards of his that provides some of this novel’s richest humor—particularly when it’s his lust, second only to morals behind his steering wheel, responsible for such collisions. Case in point: when Casey ruins his chances of a sure-thing with a hot and perfectly available female when her apartment bears the unavoidable evidence of her environmental ignorance. Or when he takes his class on a field trip to an awe-inspiring earth friendly home only to have its message overshadowed when that special student he’s aiming to impress the most gets attacked by geese while he stands there paralyzed to help her. At times one has to wonder if this bumbling narrator can ever overcome his neuroses enough to land any woman, let alone the one of his dreams, and it’s both a torture and a delight to watch him trip over himself as he discovers, time and again, that all the science in the world can’t help him navigate the tides of love.

This novel is at its best, however, when it does precisely what its author seems clearly to have set out to do in devising it: using unexpected moments of mundane life to illuminate yet another way in which climate change affects us without us even knowing it. For example when Casey and the object of his affections visit an apple orchard only to discover the trees completely bare, as the unseasonable return of winter the previous spring killed off all the apple blossoms before they could flower. Or when Casey and his pothead roommate find their own moral boundaries tested in the face of their neighbor’s energy-sucking Halloween yard decor.

In short, Love in the Time of Climate Change is a light-hearted look at a heavy-hearted subject. But the love story embedded within the tale is far more than a literary device to keep readers entertained through the story’s teaching moments. In fact it proves to supply the missing ingredient in an adult child’s delayed maturation into manhood. Without the love story in our life we’re all doomed to the ravages we’ve wrought on ourselves, is the message.

The reference in the novel’s title to Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera seems apparent. And while both stories detail an epidemic bound invariably to leave no one in its path unscathed, if I have to confront the imminent end of the world (at least as I know it) I would much rather take that ride with Casey and his manic band of Climate Changers, because with them at least I know I’ll go out laughing.

~<~

Book review by Sage Kalmus

 

Sage Kalmus is a freelance writer and editor since 2004. He earned a M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Lesley University where he was honored as student speaker at his graduation. He earned a B.S. in Film & Broadcasting from Boston University. His article “Believe in Magic” appears in the current issue (May 2015) of The Writer magazine. His short stories have appeared in Whisperings magazine, CARNIVAL Magazine, Rose Red Review, and he published an essay in The Hampshire Gazette.  

Spring is coming . . . 2015!

There are so many exciting things happening at the press—we want to share a few with you and introduce some new faces.

Last weekend, March 29th, GWP was featured at the Berkshire Festival of Women’s WritersBookfair ion Pittsfield, Massachusetts. It was a great event, and below are two photos of some of our newest fans, Fevean Keflom and Otasha Clark are S.I.T./World Learning graduate students who felt that our book, by photographer Jade Beall, The Bodies of Mothers, was amazing; later, Dede met the wonderful Vergina Gardner of Lenox, Mass., who bought a copy of our beautiful book Lasting Words: A Guide to Finding Meaning Toward the Close of Life for her retirement community.

BerkshireFestofWomenWRiters
April 3: PoemCity’s “Press Here: a Panel of Vermont Poetry Publishers” Event at the Kellogg Hubbard Library in Montpelier is on Friday, April 3rd at 6 pm-7:30 pm—tonight! Dede will be on the panel. Over the past ten years, Vermont has become a small publishing paradise.The “Press Here” event is designed to showcase and further awareness of the beautiful books that Vermont publishers of poetry have brought forth. As you may know, PoemCity is Montpelier’s swoony signature month-long extravaganza in honor of National Poetry Month. What an honor to be there. Photos TK!

Next week, Dede, Robin MacArthur and other writers and editors connected to GWP will head to Minneapolis, April 8-12th. The AWP Conference & Bookfair is an essential annual destination for writers, teachers, students, editors, and publishers. Each year more than 12,000 attendees join our community for four days of insightful dialogue, networking, and unrivaled access to the organizations and opinion-makers that matter most in contemporary literature. The 2015 conference will feature over 2,000 presenters and 550 readings, panels, and craft lectures. The bookfair hosts over 700 presses, journals, and literary organizations from around the world. AWP’s is now the largest literary conference in North America. Join us in Minneapolis to celebrate the best of what contemporary literature has to offer.

GWP is at Booth #1520 and we will feature our books and launch GWP poet, Richard Jarrette’s A Hundred Million Years of Nectar Dances—there will be a book singing, Saturday, April 11th from 1:00-3:00 and throughout the Conference/Book Fair, along with an offsite party (!) with Jarrette featured at “Reading: Sleet at the Ice House!” Thursday April 9, from 6:30 until 9:15.

Last, but not least, April 24-26th we will be featured in a BOOTH # 372 at the Green Festival Expo in NYC at the LEED Certified Javits Center for our 5th year in New York City. New York continues to be on the forefront in reducing energy consumption and has one of highest percentages of green space among US cities. It also has the highest percentage of workers commuting by public transportation, bicycle, or by foot. The city’s sustainability program PlaNYC has helped achieve the cleanest air in 50 years, adding 865,000 trees and five million feet of reflective rooftop to the urban landscape and has helped to reduce the carbon emissions by 19% since 2005. If you want a badge, email dede@greenwriterspress.com and we can get you in for $10. We will feature Josie and the Fourth Grade Bike Brigade and Love in the Time of Climate Change with author appearances on Saturday—we will also be giving away free copies of both books! JOSIE is a finalist for the Green Earth Book Award and LOVE is a finalist for Foreword Reviews Book of the Year Award! Our other finalist for Foreword Reviews is Polly and the One and Only World—a ya/dystopian/fantasy that features a heroine that will surely become a legend, Polly Lightfoot—a 15-year-old Vermont witch!

Please welcome our newest college interns! 

Danielle Gyger
DanielleGygerDanielle is new to the East Coast and excited to be working with Green Writers Press! She’s originally from Michigan, and plans to return in good time to attend Michigan State University in the fall, for a degree in English. Her interests in this field include creative writing and children’s literature. When Danielle isn’t chain drinking coffee and working on philosophy homework, she enjoys playing music with family, and spending time outdoors with her wonderful partner. Danielle proofread our YA spring book, The Order of the Trees.

Samuel Ripper
SamRipperSam grew up around central Ohio near Columbus. He has spent the last two years at Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont, focusing on earning a degree in Economics and Behavioral Neuroscience. During his time at Landmark, Sam became interested in environmental issues as a means to protect the environment around him. This has cumulated in founding the Environmental Club at Landmark, and working with faculty members to improve the schools carbon emissions. Sam is currently working with Green Writers Press as their community service intern and hopes to use his skills and interest in business to help market some of the upcoming books being published in the spring and fall of this year. Sam is a member of The Vermont Student Climate Coalition (VSCC), which is a network of Vermont students committed to fighting for sustainability and climate justice.

 

The Wearing o’ the Green—Vermont Style

This St. Patrick’s Day, it’s not only the Irish who will be clad in forty shades of green. GWP publisher, Dede Cummings, and her ecologically-minded team at Vermont Green Writers Press, are launching their own green tribute to the Emerald Isle.

Green Writers Press—whose books are already being nominated for several prestigious national literary awards—is launching an exciting new imprint, sure to green the hearts of its readers.

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GreenPlace, a line promoting “Green Places & Cultural Spaces for all Readers,” will launch two new green voices in the Irish-American literary scene, authors both deeply committed to preserving Place.

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Our First High School Intern & News

LindseyVachonHSInternGWPLindsey Vachon is Green Writers Press’ first high school intern. She is a junior at Leland and Gray Union High School in Townshend, Vermont, where she lives, and hopes to learn everything there is to learn about writing and the publishing world. She loves writing, mostly fiction, and besides that, has a love for creating pottery, traveling and learning about the stars. Please welcome the talented and wonderful, Lindsey Vachon!

Lindsey is helping to edit this young adult/middle grade reader fiction coming out in May, The Order of the Trees.TheOrderoftheTreesFrontCover

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From Walden to Walden North: Reading, Writing, and Publishing Vermont

RoadWaldenNorthCoverMKTRooted in a Thoreauvian sense of Place, a new literary movement is sweeping Vermont. From Walden to Walden North, Vermont, localvores have shifted their focus from eating to reading, writing, and publishing! We are thrilled to be a big part of this movement. Our recent NEK (Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom) book tour was a great success—there is a lot of interest in our new publishing company. As publishers in a global market, we mediate between the great world and the place we call home. We look for the genius loci, the “spirit of place,” in selecting our titles and partnering with our authors and readers.

Locally, Vermonters are unearthing what was once “concealed”—to borrow Thoreau’s words—in their “haze-filled valleys” and mountainside farms to share with readers “their Waldens” in poetry, stories, and novels.

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Jade Beall’s Celebration of the Mother’s Body

Photographer Jade Beall is on a nationwide mission to celebrate the mother’s body, un-Photoshopped and unretouched. The impetus for the book project, The Bodies of Mothers, started with her own feelings of inferiority of her body after she had her first child. According to Beall:

As I first sat down to think about the beauty of the mother’s body—stretch marks, cellulite, and saggy-ness included—I was immediately struck by how hard we try to hide what we deem as ‘unattractive.’ In this project, women are more then shedding a little clothing; they are tearing away the self-imposed layers, exposing their insecurities and laying vulnerable for all to see. This is what beauty looks like, more than supple skin or tight abs—beauty is the ability to see oneself and the power of creating new life. It is accepting it all, without labeling it good or bad, with hands wide open—no matter how they may shake in the beginning.

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Our First Newsletter ~ Fall, 2015

Green Writers Press: Giving Voice to Writers & Artists Who Will Make the World a Better Place

Green Writers Press

Green Writers Press

Our fall booksGreen Writers Express include Polly and the One and Only World, Love in the Time of Climate Change, Josie and the Fourth Grade Bike Brigade and Contemporary Vermont Fiction.We are so proud of our books. Please come join us November 9th at Next Stage in Putney, VT for a party to celebrate Contemporary Vermont Fiction with a reading and live music! If you’d like to contribute to that book to help Robin and Dede with expenses, Robin has created a beautiful Indiegogo campaign… The video alone is worth a quick look: www.indiegogo.com/projects/contemporary-vermont-fiction-an-anthology We have had an amazing year here at GWP: The fact that our mission resonates with so many readers of good books is evident wherever we go and via the emails and letters we receive. From the Nantucket Book Festival to Bookstock in Woodstock, VT the Brattleboro Literary Festival and the Northern Woodlands Writers’ Conference, our authors are out there reading, signing books and lending their unique voices to the environmental movement. Many of us were at the Climate March in NYC, too, and we know that there is tremendous momentum in the world to create change! Our press is growing. Thanks for sharing!EVENTS: Brian Adams Book Tour; Don Bredes too! . . . Stay tuned for our 2015 Spring List!
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Photos by Dede Cummings
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Left: GWP poet, Leland Kinsey.Sign up for our monthly news by filling in the form at right! We will keep your email private! 

The Climate Rally & Our Fabulous Fall List

IMG_1889.JPGThe People’s Climate March
Green Writers Press authors and editors were down in NYC in full force with the rest of the world watching as 1% of Vermonters and almost half a million people marched for Climate Justice! We are proud beyond words to have been asked to carry the Vermont flag. Here are some photos from The March—one of Dede Cummings and Vermont-Irish poet from our book, So Little Time, Greg Delanty! Please share and keep the momentum going….March On!

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Growing and Catching Our Breath: “Cli-fi,” A Surprise from Julia Alvarez & More!

IMG_5194.JPGThings at GWP are in full summer bloom, along with the heirloom yellow lilies given to Dede and Robin by Howard Frank Mosher—actually, I should say stolen yellow lilies, for Howard, his wife, Phyllis, and a local woman, now deceased (who was a Kingdom legend and most likely in one of Howard’s stories), snuck over to an abandoned farmhouse and dug up quite a pike if bulbs last fall. Howard brought them down to us as a gift at our inaugural publishing launch!

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Our Summer Intern is here! Meet Desmond Peeples

dspeeplesDesmond S. Peeples is a writer of fiction and nonfiction loosely based in Vermont. His work is either available or forthcoming in Big Bridge, Cultural Logic, and Goreyesque.  During his time at Goddard College in Plainfield, VT, Desmond completed the manuscript of a speculative novel, and he is currently hunting for literary representation. Most recently he founded Mount Island, an online literary magazine now accepting quality prose and poetry for its debut issue.

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Summer Is Upon Us & Some Exciting News

IMG_1860.JPGWith summer finally here, we can all let out a collective sigh of relief, but I am doing some stacking of wood for next winter at my home office, so there is always the “Winter Ready” — to paraphrase our very own poet, Leland Kinsey’s new book title — work that has to be done, especially in Vermont with our longer winters… But that brings me to the next thing: winter, seasons, climate crisis, and building awareness.

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New E-books & Spring is Finally Here

GWP party tabloid.pubLast night, Phoenix Books in Burlington, Vermont, hosted the “Green Writers Press Celebration Party.” What a great event! Photos TK. Here is the swell poster Kristen at Phoenix made.

Join us to meet Dede Cummings, the publisher behind Green Writers Press, as well as authors from the new press. Phoenix Books is partnering with GWP — a new, Vermont-based publisher that prints their books in Vermont and seeks to change the way books are printed by using only post-consumer waste paper and not virgin timber — to celebrate this new indie publisher.

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Exciting Events coming up….

GWPmagazineCover21042It is an exciting time for GWP! Our new press is growing rapidly, but we need your support. Please visit our donation page if you’d like to donate. Here is some news to share!

We are launching the INAUGURAL print & on-line “GWP | Magazine” at the end of October! Click here for details!
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Readings & News

SoLittleTimeFrontCoverFebReleaseSo Little Time had its inaugural reading at St. Michael’s College in Colchester, Vermont, on January 30th. Here is a gallery of photos of the various poets who read from Gloria Seidler, wife of poet Ralph Culver and a nature photographer as well as a holistic healer. Gloria donated these great photos to us as GWP!

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“Is Amazon Bad for Books?”—”Yes it is,” according to Vermont author Howard Frank Mosher

This post is so good, we decided to reblog it here:

In the era of the Kindle, a book costs the same price as a sandwich. Dennis Johnson, an independent publisher, says that “Amazon has successfully fostered the idea that a book is a thing of minimal value—it’s a widget.” Construction by Ian Wright.

In the era of the Kindle, a book costs the same price as a sandwich. Dennis Johnson, an independent publisher, says that “Amazon has successfully fostered the idea that a book is a thing of minimal value—it’s a widget.” Construction by Ian Wright.

There’s an excellent article in the combined Feb. 17 and 24 issues of THE NEW YORKER magazine, by George Packer, called “Cheap Words: Is Amazon’s Business Model Good for Books?”
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A new day, a new dawn

As the Keystone XL pipeline clears a hurdle, we await word from the Obama administration. A New York Times article sums up the plan well:

Environmentalists said they were dismayed at some of the report’s conclusions and disputed its objectivity, but they also said it offered Mr. Obama reasons to reject the pipeline. They said they planned to intensify efforts to try to influence Mr. Kerry’s decision. For more than two years, environmentalists have protested the project and been arrested in demonstrations against it around the country. But many Republicans and oil industry executives, who support the pipeline because they say it creates jobs and increases supplies from a friendly source of oil, embraced the findings.

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Happy Holidays from Green Writers Press

Our Radio Show/PODCASTS

Vermont author, Howard Frank Mosher, and publisher, Dede Cummings, commenced the first-ever “Author-New Publisher Tour of Vermont Bookstores.” This trip was Howard’s idea. “Why not tour the bookstores, take the pulse of book selling in Vermont, see what people are reading and buying, and just talk on the way,” he asked me, ending with a chuckle. As we drove, I held the mic and asked him to tell me some stories. This is the first of 4 Podcasts. Enjoy, and Happy Holidays from Green Writers Press!

LISTEN HERE

PHOTOS FROM THE ROAD TRIP:

Things just keep happening!

A busy time of year you ask?  
SoLittleTimeFrontCoverFebRelease. . . it is, but we are pretty excited here at GWP, with the launch of So Little Time: Words and Images for a World in Climate Crisis. The book just grew, and grew, at the end we added new poems and things got moved around, and the book emerged better and more beautiful than I could have imagined!
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A new book coming out soon!

SoLittleTimeCovSalessmlEdited by Green Writers Press managing editor, Dede Cummings, with a Foreword from John Elder, and poems that feature the work of Greg Delanty, along with quotes from such environmentalists, as BIll McKibbenSo Little Time is an interactive and interpretive book that will inspire, enrich, and a call to action in an urgent plea to stop global warming.
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